Monthly Archives: October 2010

Top Five Halloween Party Songs

Seeing as my favorite holiday is now upon us,  I’ve compiled a list of Halloween-themed songs for any party. Without further ado, here’s my Top Five Halloween Party Songs:

Nosferatu (Ft. Mr. Lif) -DJ Krush – Now while most hip-hop Halloween songs are somewhere between the darkness of Biggie’s “Suicidal Thoughts” and the silliness of the Fat Boys’  “Are You Ready for Freddy?”, this song by the turntablist samurai DJ Krush is actually a good mix of sick beats with a nice flow from ex-Jukie Mr. Lif. It’s cool to hear Lif spit about something other than politics, and still be able to hit you with lines like “numbers crunch your bone well”.

Bela Lugosi’s Dead – Bauhaus – If you want to see just how cool Peter Murphy is, look no further than the above performance of the song at Coachella 2005. The song itself  is a goth rock masterpiece, and would definitely fit any party that has The Hunger playing in the background.  Another cool version occurred when he played the song along with Trent Reznor and TV on the Radio backing him up.

Red Right Hand – Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds – Cave is no stranger to making spooky music when he’s with the Bad Seeds, and this song is a pretty good example of how dark it can get when he’s really getting into it. Like the Bauhaus song it’s been used in movie work, showing up in all the Scream movies and the first Hellboy.

Dracula – Gorillaz – If you’re like me who’s seen the “Clint Eastwood” video 5 million times, you know that the first Gorillaz album had a serious horror movie vibe to it. With a song that has lines like  “Everybody party time/
Some of us will never sleep again”, you know it’s about being a laid back, cool vamp. That or it’s about drugs.

Thriller – Michael Jackson – This one is pretty much a no brainer. I could go on about the amount of work John Landis did to make the video into what is consistently considered one of the best of all time. I could say it’s a bit more poignant now that Jackson’s gone, but honestly, I’m gonna let Dave Chappelle say everything I want to say:

Honorable Mentions:

Werewolf Bar Mitzvah – Tracey Morgan via 30 Rock

Dead Man’s Party – Oingo Boingo

Pet Sematary – The Ramones

Halloween – The Misfits

Wolf Like Me – TV on the Radio

Dawn of the Dead – Does It Offend You, Yeah?

Monster (Ft. Jay-Z, Rick Ross, Nicki Minaj, and Bon Iver) – Kanye West

Superstition – Stevie Wonder

So Haunted – Cut Copy

Comic Mashups to Logo Destruction

I love me some mashups, especially visual ones like the ones Kenny Keil did with comic book characters and hip-hop albums. My favorite is definite this Big Daddy Kane/ Avengers mix:

While on the comics tip, Adam Warrock is one of the co-host of War Rocket Ajax, a comics/pop culture podcast and a  rapper whose songs are actually getting past my normally disdainful opinion on nerdcore rap. It’s probably because I love comic books, and the hip-hop/comic connection isn’t a new one.

For all you webcomic fans, you should check out Chileno Juan Santapau’s The Secret Knots.

Dani Jones put up a pretty straightforward set of rules for creating comics: Make Stuff, and Show It to People.

Let’s get into a cyborg corner real quick: First off, while I think the title “Kanye West, Media Cyborg” is a bit of a stretch, it’s a great hook for an article that also has some great points. If you want to see the real deal though, check out the wikipedia entry on Neil Harbisson, a man who decided to install an eyeborg so that he could hear the colors that he was born without.

While on the topic of wiki-anything, Desmond Warzel’s hilarious short story “Wikihistory” plays one of the most known tropes in sci-fi, that of time travelers always trying to kill Hitler.

To finish this off, check out this Academy Award-winning short film by the French animation team F5 , Logorama:

A Call to Cram

So for the last two months I’ve been talking with Cindy Raspiller about making a magazine. From my perspective, I’ve read things from people who aren’t getting more exposure for it. Now that is attributed by some people to the disastrous signal-to-noise ratio in content that is apparent  on the internet, but that’s something any good editor could figure out. What bothers the hell out of me is that almost-obsessive need for exclusivity, the way we’re making gated communities out of what we read. The thought why should I have to read multiple magazines to get my fix? has been in my mind for months now, and now I think I have found a way of putting it out there.

I know there will be people who put out the already-old saying “print media is dead”, but what they don’t realize when they’re reading an article from an iPad screen or grabbing an article from an online publication is that diversification is the name of the game now. You must, for the sake of getting the content out there, to find new ways of getting cool things out there faster than the other guy.

Another thing that we talked about was, as we both have full-time jobs now, how to keep your creativity going when you have a job or two. Things are still pretty touch-and-go for opportunities here in the US, but that shouldn’t stop an artist and writer to throw away their dreams of making their work known. It can be done, it just takes someone to give them a shot.

That’s why I’m a part of Cram Magazine. I want the people who have something to show or something to say that don’t want to just leave it to chance for the gates to open for us. Sometimes you just have to start knocking them down, one great magazine at a time. Who wants in?

Top Five Characters that Should be in the League of Extraordinary Gentlemen

Reading a new interview from Alan Moore always reminds me of one of his greats: The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen. I’m sure most will only remember the godawful  Sean Connery movie, but the comic portrayed Victorian literary characters in a great steampunk English backdrop against a Cavorite-hunting Professor Moriarty and the War of the Worlds itself. Moore is still writing the series, with the next part of  Vol. 3 -Century being released sometime in 2011. With that in mind, I started wondering what other characters made throughout the century would fit in this illustrious and highly dysfunctional super-heroic team?


Dr. Victor Frankenstein: Every team needs a Henry Pym, and having one of fiction’s most famous mad scientists on the team would definitely help. I can even see him as a sort of forensic scientist that can aid the team in figuring out how to properly dissect a shoggoth when they land on English soils. You know he can also bring some bruisers to the fight, provided you give him a lab, a graveyard, and a slaughterhouse.

Lara Croft: Now before anyone freaks out, think about it. She has all the fighting and shooting skills that the current team’s adventurer, Alan Quatermain, has and then some. Seeing that Moore is taking references from TV shows for Century, I don’t see why it would be much of a stretch to take one of the more famous video game references (besides licensing issues, of course) and put her on the team. She’s also British to boot.

The Doctor: While some might call this choice a bit overpowered, bringing one of British sci-fi’s largest exports over could make for an interesting team member if done right.I mean, think about it: the Doctor as written by Alan Moore? you know the Time Lord is going to end up pretty twisted.

Nick Haflinger: Now this character isn’t known to many sci-fi fans, but he was the hacker protagonist in the novel The Shockwave Rider by John Brunner.  The book was published in 1975, way before the cyberpunk genre blew up. This book started the use of the word “worm” as a self-replicating computer program. Although his tools are pretty outdated now, as he used public telephones to make new identities, developing him into a reverse anachronistic character for a League in the ’60s and ’70s is a good idea. He could use computer/programming concepts that wouldn’t exist yet, and serve as a bridge between dystopian characters like Winston Smith from older stories like 1984 (covered in another League story, Black Dossier) and the crazed hackers  that had yet to come out  from writers like William Gibson or Neal Stephenson.

Hannibal Lecter: An excellently cultured serial killer, Lecter’s medical and psychiatric knowledge is of great use to a team when trying to hunt other psychopaths down. If the fact that in Hannibal Rising a young Lecter is given kick-ass kenjutsu skills is added , this plus his intense way of messing with people’s minds would make him a great anti-hero on par with Midnighter from the Authority. Imagine it: He gets in the bad guys’ heads, makes them slip up once, and then slices them up in preparation for a wonderful dinner.

Honorable Mentions

The Shadow

Tyler Durden

Patrick Bateman

Buffy Summers

 

With that in mind, I started wondering what other characters made throughout the century would fit in this illustrious and highly dysfunctional super-heroic team?

Hannibal Lecter:

Thomas Harris’ excellently cultured serial killer is the first on my list for one reason alone: with his medical and psychological knowledge, he could go toe-to-toe with an hero like The Midnighter from (now defunct ) Wildstorm’s The Authority. Imagine it: He could size up an opponent just like he sized up Clarice Starling, Dr. Chilton, and (Red Dragon’s character), and once they’re all thoroughly mind-fucked, he slices them in two with the katana he kept from Hannibal Rising.